Juvenile Cases

Because it recognizes that the legal needs of children are different than those of adults, California has created a separate juvenile court system for minors – specifically, those under the age of 18. When certain crimes are alleged, however, the district attorney can recommend that a child be tried in adult courts. Such crimes include murder, arson, armed robbery, forcible sex crimes, and kidnapping.

In most instances, however, juvenile cases are handled by the juvenile court system and involve three different kinds of offenses. The first of these are cases that, if committed by an adult, would be considered criminal. California’s Welfare and Institutions Code describes these are Code §602, which is why you’ll often hear youths involved in such cases described as “602 kids.”

Second among these cases are those involving activities that are not considered illegal in the adult world. Such cases – running away from home, for example, or violating curfew – are considered those where children are in need of supervision. This is covered under Welfare and Institutions Code §601, which is why youths involved in such cases are often described as “601 kids.”

The third of these different kinds of offenses involve children who have been abused, neglected or abandoned, where it is the court’s responsibility to decide who is going to be responsible for their care.

Juvenile cases can be quite stressful for parents involved. In the third type cited above, for example, the court can determine who will have custody of the child, and for how long. In some cases, the court can even permanently remove a parent’s right to child and put the child up for adoption. It is because of the serious nature and future impact of juvenile cases that we encourage you to contact the Law Office of Ronald G. Brower for appropriate representation.

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